The Future Design Series: Fashion, Innovation and Technology

As the world consumes its way to an environmental apocalypse, it has become obvious that humankind will have to reassess the way it uses its resources. One way we have come to cope with this challenge is through innovations and sustainable design.

The intention of sustainable design is to “eliminate negative environmental impact completely through skillful, sensitive design”.

Manifestations of sustainable design require renewable resources, impact the environment minimally, and connect people with the natural environment.

Over the coming months we will be examining some of these design developments aimed at building a sustainable future. Some of these are already in the market; others are still no more than ideas and prototypes. Whatever stage they are in, what they offer is hope. 

Future Design: Fashion Edition

According to the United Nations, the fashion industry is responsible for 10% of global greenhouse emissions. That is twice more than the aviation industry. Every second, the equivalent of one garbage truck of textiles is landfilled or burned. Even without the aid of these statistics, it’s easy for us to see just how unsustainable fashion currently is.  

Fashion’s unsustainability runs from end-to-end. For instance, It takes roughly 20,000 litres of water to produce just one kilogram of cotton, equivalent to one t-shirt and a pair of jeans. So that by the time the end-consumer buys it, enormous amounts of water and power have already been used and wasted, and in the case of synthetic fabrics, microplastics are released into the ocean. 

A viable solution here is design. Fueled by a vision of a sustainable future and advancements in technology, fashion houses and startups have taken up the challenge of designing a more sustainable future for the fashion industry. In my estimation, this involves the fundamental overhauling of fashion and its supply chain. It also means redefining our traditional values as they relate to clothes because what we believe our clothes should be made of and who we imagine ought to make them all depends on our perception.

In this first edition of #FUTUREDESIGN, we look at the design breakthroughs that hold the key to fashion’s sustainable future.

https://ecowarriorprincess.net/2019/07/future-design-series-fashion-innovation-technology/

7 INNOVATIVE IDEAS CHANGING THE FASHION INDUSTRY

innovative-ideasfashion-week-innovations

INNOVATION SNAPSHOT

Some of our favourite fashion innovations from recent months, focusing on marketing, emerging technologies and design

We’re in the midst of the fall Fashion Week season. Besides showcasing the latest fashion trends and designs, these events also feature some of the industry’s most exciting innovations, such as Superpersonal’s virtual fitting app, which was showcased during London Fashion Week in February. 

We thought this would be a good time to resurface some of our favourite fashion innovations from the last several months. Having recently shared 10 of our top innovations in sustainable clothing, the following innovations focus on the industry in a broader sense — including breakthroughs in marketing, emerging technologies and design.

https://www.springwise.com/innovative-ideas/fashion-week-innovations

15 innovations changing the fashion world

From biodegradable glitter to fabrics made from seaweed or orange fibres – these are the next generation of fashion innovators. Algiknit, BioGlitz, circular.fashion, FLOCUS, Frumat, Good on You, Mango Materials, Nano Textile, Orange Fibre, PAPTIC, PlanetCare, Provenance, Reverse Resources, Scalable Garment Technologies and Style Lend are brands working hard to transform the fashion industry for good.

G_Lona-Style-Lend-1

Fifteen selected start-ups are offering a better future to the fashion industry. That is why they are actually being supported by the Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator through partners like Adidas, C&A, Galeries Lafayette, Kering, Target and Zalando.

Algiknit, BioGlitz, circular.fashion, FLOCUS, Frumat, Good on You, Mango Materials, Nano Textile, Orange Fibre, PAPTIC, PlanetCare, Provenance, Reverse Resources, Scalable Garment Technologies and Style Lend represent varied supply chain areas -from alternative raw materials to new business models-. But, who are them? What kind of innovations are they offering?

A better future for fashion

https://luxiders.com/innovations-changing-fashion/

A History of Fashion’s Obsession with the Space Age, From Courrèges to Chanel

Isaac Newton were alive today, he might have come up with a fourth law of motion just to deal with fashion trends, which seem to defy all existing rules by moving forwards and backwards at the same time. Fashion is supposed to take us into the future, but wait long enough and yesterday’s trends will come back eventually, some returning faster than others.

In 2017, for example, we’re seeing the return of Paco Rabanne’s signature metallic chain-metal dresses, which first walked the runways in the 1960s, and were “in” again in the early-aughts during Paris Hilton’s heyday. Now, they can be found in Paris nightclubs on twentysomethings like Bella Hadid. To boot, white go-go boots are back as well—a trend that similarly took off in the ’60s along with Space Age style, starting with André Courrèges and was later recycled during the Studio 54 era. Now, they’re back with the help of brands like Balenciaga. (And Hadid too, of course.)

As with the constellations, drawing lines between reoccurring trends can help make sense of where we come from, how we ended up here, and where we might be headed. And fittingly, all roads lead to outer space at the moment, from Chanel’s rocket launch on the runway to Christopher Kane’s cosmic prints.

MORE https://www.wmagazine.com/story/space-age-style-history-courreges

Aliens Have Officially Landed on Earth, and They Just Walked Two Paris Fashion Week Runways

I have seen a lot of wild things making their runway debuts, but extra-terrestrials? That’s, like, next-level strange. Sure, we all witness some absurd styles during fashion week—during couture week, especially—but I honestly don’t think I can say I’ve seen anything quite like this Paris Fashion Week alien trend. Have aliens arrived on Earth, or is it just a coincidence that two different designers decided to incorporate alien-chic into their runway shows on the same day? I don’t know if we’re all just living in the Twilight Zone or what, but something is going on in Paris right now, and I’m not sure if I really want to know the truth.

shutterstock 10120552e Aliens Have Officially Landed on Earth, and They Just Walked Two Paris Fashion Week Runways

Manish Arora, Fall/Winter 2019

Whether or not aliens have invaded Earth—and frankly, I’d prefer to stay in the dark on this one—they certainly have invaded the Paris Fashion Week runways. On Thursday, not one, but two shows featured alien-inspired looks. Both Manish Arora and Rick Owens have done some weird things with their collections before. Arora’s spring/summer 2019 collection was wild, but there were no aliens. Rick Owens always manages to somehow make his models look like stylish cavemen or modern art projects, but, once again, no aliens in sight. However, both of these designers used alien-chic looks in their runway shows for Fall/Winter 2019. I truly hope Manish Arora and Rick Owens just happened to both have similar visions for their collections, and we’re not really all about to scroll through photos of real aliens. TBH, I don’t know what to think anymore.

shutterstock 10120564u Aliens Have Officially Landed on Earth, and They Just Walked Two Paris Fashion Week Runways

Rick Owens, Fall/Winter 2019

MORE https://stylecaster.com/aliens-paris-fashion-week/#slide-2

The Evolution of Space Age Fashion

On July 20, 1969, NASA astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, and Michael Collins successfully completed the Apollo 11 mission which culminated in Armstrong taking that fateful space walk on the moon’s surface, telling those listening, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Armstrong’s legendary accomplishment is chronicled in Damian Chazelle’s latest film, First Man (opening today), which the Hollywood Reporter has called a, “sober, contemplative picture [with] emotional involvement, visceral tension, and yes, even suspense, in addition to stunning technical craft.”

Although the six American flags which have been left on the moon since Apollo 11 have been confirmed to have turned white due to alternating days of searing sunlight and 100° heat and days of numbing-cold -150°, there’s no mistaking the technicolor impact that the mission had on various facets of industries.

Since the days of the space race, designers like like André Courrèges, Paco Rabanne, and Pierre Cardin, have attempted to sartorially predict what the future held for society – whether forecasting the daily uniforms for the masses — or more esoteric fare for those on the fringes as drastic changes occur in society.

Dubbed “space age” in their terse assessment by fashion critics, these looks have permeated couture houses in as futuristic silhouettes, and have been more overt homages to NASA by contemporary designers.

Here’s a look at some of the space age fashion over the years

MORE  https://www.highsnobiety.com/p/evolution-space-aged-fashion/