A History of Fashion’s Obsession with the Space Age, From Courrèges to Chanel

Isaac Newton were alive today, he might have come up with a fourth law of motion just to deal with fashion trends, which seem to defy all existing rules by moving forwards and backwards at the same time. Fashion is supposed to take us into the future, but wait long enough and yesterday’s trends will come back eventually, some returning faster than others.

In 2017, for example, we’re seeing the return of Paco Rabanne’s signature metallic chain-metal dresses, which first walked the runways in the 1960s, and were “in” again in the early-aughts during Paris Hilton’s heyday. Now, they can be found in Paris nightclubs on twentysomethings like Bella Hadid. To boot, white go-go boots are back as well—a trend that similarly took off in the ’60s along with Space Age style, starting with André Courrèges and was later recycled during the Studio 54 era. Now, they’re back with the help of brands like Balenciaga. (And Hadid too, of course.)

As with the constellations, drawing lines between reoccurring trends can help make sense of where we come from, how we ended up here, and where we might be headed. And fittingly, all roads lead to outer space at the moment, from Chanel’s rocket launch on the runway to Christopher Kane’s cosmic prints.

MORE https://www.wmagazine.com/story/space-age-style-history-courreges

Aliens Have Officially Landed on Earth, and They Just Walked Two Paris Fashion Week Runways

I have seen a lot of wild things making their runway debuts, but extra-terrestrials? That’s, like, next-level strange. Sure, we all witness some absurd styles during fashion week—during couture week, especially—but I honestly don’t think I can say I’ve seen anything quite like this Paris Fashion Week alien trend. Have aliens arrived on Earth, or is it just a coincidence that two different designers decided to incorporate alien-chic into their runway shows on the same day? I don’t know if we’re all just living in the Twilight Zone or what, but something is going on in Paris right now, and I’m not sure if I really want to know the truth.

shutterstock 10120552e Aliens Have Officially Landed on Earth, and They Just Walked Two Paris Fashion Week Runways

Manish Arora, Fall/Winter 2019

Whether or not aliens have invaded Earth—and frankly, I’d prefer to stay in the dark on this one—they certainly have invaded the Paris Fashion Week runways. On Thursday, not one, but two shows featured alien-inspired looks. Both Manish Arora and Rick Owens have done some weird things with their collections before. Arora’s spring/summer 2019 collection was wild, but there were no aliens. Rick Owens always manages to somehow make his models look like stylish cavemen or modern art projects, but, once again, no aliens in sight. However, both of these designers used alien-chic looks in their runway shows for Fall/Winter 2019. I truly hope Manish Arora and Rick Owens just happened to both have similar visions for their collections, and we’re not really all about to scroll through photos of real aliens. TBH, I don’t know what to think anymore.

shutterstock 10120564u Aliens Have Officially Landed on Earth, and They Just Walked Two Paris Fashion Week Runways

Rick Owens, Fall/Winter 2019

MORE https://stylecaster.com/aliens-paris-fashion-week/#slide-2

The Evolution of Space Age Fashion

On July 20, 1969, NASA astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, and Michael Collins successfully completed the Apollo 11 mission which culminated in Armstrong taking that fateful space walk on the moon’s surface, telling those listening, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Armstrong’s legendary accomplishment is chronicled in Damian Chazelle’s latest film, First Man (opening today), which the Hollywood Reporter has called a, “sober, contemplative picture [with] emotional involvement, visceral tension, and yes, even suspense, in addition to stunning technical craft.”

Although the six American flags which have been left on the moon since Apollo 11 have been confirmed to have turned white due to alternating days of searing sunlight and 100° heat and days of numbing-cold -150°, there’s no mistaking the technicolor impact that the mission had on various facets of industries.

Since the days of the space race, designers like like André Courrèges, Paco Rabanne, and Pierre Cardin, have attempted to sartorially predict what the future held for society – whether forecasting the daily uniforms for the masses — or more esoteric fare for those on the fringes as drastic changes occur in society.

Dubbed “space age” in their terse assessment by fashion critics, these looks have permeated couture houses in as futuristic silhouettes, and have been more overt homages to NASA by contemporary designers.

Here’s a look at some of the space age fashion over the years

MORE  https://www.highsnobiety.com/p/evolution-space-aged-fashion/

At New York Fashion Week, the Runway Show Is Back

Designers pulled out all the stops at New York Fashion Week with over-the-top shows that layered on elaborate sets and live performances

Models at rag & bone’s show Sept. 6 during New York Fashion Week. PHOTO: ANGELA WEISS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

More was more at New York Fashion Week, which ends today, making the case that live runway shows are relevant in a digital world.

Designers, including some who recently had skipped showing in New York, stormed back. Some houses dazzled audiences with glitzy venues, performers—and even a robot—as if conceding that clothes alone aren’t enough to inspire excitement. Here are five highlights of the week.

The Runway Show Is Back

The fashion show, which seemed in peril just a few seasons ago, is definitely in vogue. The number of shows on the calendar of IMG— organizer of one Fashion Week—rose to 100 this season from 83 last season.

Jason Wu is among those who returned to the catwalk after taking two seasons off and hosting small presentations while his label reassessed business. Upscale contemporary fashion house rag & bone hosted runway shows following several seasons of presentations, short films and videos to preview collections. Just last year, founder and chief brand officer Marcus Wainwright told the WSJ the traditional runway show “doesn’t feel original” anymore. This time, Mr. Wainwright shook things up with a blend of technology and live performers. The rag & bone show had a circular runway, dancers, the Brooklyn Youth Chorus and drummers from the band Atoms of Peace. A robot captured video of the show and broadcast the footage on screens throughout the venue.

“Taking a break from presenting the collection in a traditional format has allowed us to explore different narratives that align with our brand aesthetic,” Mr. Wainwright said. “And to bring that all together under one roof, was in effect our answer to creating more of an experience, rather than a straight fashion show.”

Ralph Lauren transformed a Wall Street site into ‘Ralph’s Club,’ an over-the-top glamorous nightspot inspired by 1920s and ’30s New York City. PHOTO: BILLY FARRELL/BFA

Take Me Away

Forget your troubles and just get happy. That’s what Ralph Lauren was after when he transformed a Wall Street building into an Art Deco nightclub inspired by 1920s and 1930s New York City. The evening set a new bar for over-the-top glamour and excitement. As guests in black tie or black-and-white arrived at “Ralph’s Club,” a band played American Songbook favorites. Models sauntered among the tables and booths, showing off the clothes. After the show, Janelle Monae brought the house down by singing jazz tunes, dancing on tables and engaging the audience in call-and-response.

“Ralph’s Club was about getting dressed up and wearing something that you love that makes you feel good and then going to a place that lifts you up for that moment,” said Mr. Lauren, who has made his runway shows immersive experiences in recent years.

Tommy Hilfiger also embraced escapism, showing his latest collection co-designed with performer Zendaya at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. The outdoor set recreated a ’70s-era block party with models dancing to recorded music amid brownstone stoops and shiny convertibles. Tom Ford celebrated iconic New York by showing in an abandoned subway station. The designer cited a 1965 photo of Andy Warhol and muse Edie Sedgwick atop a New York City manhole as an inspiration.

The Deveaux New York show had a drumline and singers, seen on the runway with designer Tommy Ton, in white shirt. PHOTO: MIKE COPPOLA/GETTY IMAGES

Turn Up the Volume

Models parading down a catwalk aren’t enough to thrill camera-phone-wielding guests. They need Instagrammable entertainment—so having a dance or song performance has almost become a must. Designers hope such bells and whistles enhance the clothes, not distract from them. Deveaux New York, a New York-based luxury minimalist line that specializes in elevating wardrobe classics, hosted a celebratory show with a drumline, a small band and lead singers who have appeared on “The Voice.” Models, including amateurs as well as notables like Veronica Webb and DJ Honey Dijon, danced on the runway. The Blonds, a luxury house whose over-the-top getups are favored by entertainers, collaborated with “Moulin Rouge! The Musical” for its fashion show at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre. Cast members performed songs while celebrities including Billy Porter and Paris Hilton made appearances. Ulla Johson’s show included a small indie band. Meanwhile, Christian Siriano of “Project Runway” fame set up gallerist and painter Ashley Longshore on stage. As models including Siriano favorite Coco Rocha strode around her, Ms. Longshore worked on huge portraits of Frida Kahlo, Laverne Cox, Ms. Rocha and others.

Guests arrived at the Pyer Moss show Sunday at the Kings Theatre in Brooklyn. PHOTO: KENA BETANCUR/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

A Social Event

Pyer Moss’s show was highly anticipated after designer Kerby Jean-Raymond took a season off from the runway treadmill. Mr. Raymond, who grew up in Brooklyn, wanted his young fans to be part of the spectacle at the Kings Theatre in the borough’s Flatbush neighborhood. The 32-year-old designer used social media to make that happen, first through open casting calls on Instagram and then by inviting 500 fans, also on Instagram. The other 2,500 guests were a mix of friends, celebrities and industry professionals. Thousands of people sought tickets; Mr. Jean-Raymond reposted a fan’s message joking that she was willing “to sell her soul” to get in.

Brandon Maxwell, on the runway at his show Saturday, was among designers who held shows in Brooklyn. PHOTO: BEBETO MATTHEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brooklyn Is the Place to Be

In recent years, just two or three high-profile brands took the edgy step of making the fashion flock trek from Manhattan to the hip borough of Brooklyn. This season, an increasing number of designers—even die-hard Manhattan fan Michael Kors—held shows there. Brandon Maxwell, who won the top womenswear designer award this year from the Council of Fashion Designers, turned a Brooklyn event space into a bar called Brandon’s. A neon pink sign spelled out the name of the bar, which offered cotton candy and sippy cups of cocktails such as a “New Fashioned.” Tory Burch showed at the Brooklyn Museum, where the CFDA has twice held its annual awards. Also showing in Brooklyn were Phillip Lim, Rihanna (for the second time) and Eckhaus Latta, a fashion-show-in-Brooklyn pioneer. Why? Because Brooklyn is cool. Mr. Maxwell lives there, as do a number of young designers, and, he told Women’s Wear Daily, he wanted to celebrate the place.

Corrections & Amplifications
The Council of Fashion Designers of America and events and talent manager IMG organized separate New York fashion week calendars. An earlier version of this article failed to mention that CFDA organizes its own calendar, incorrectly implying there is only one fashion week calendar. (Sept. 13, 2019) Models at the Tommy Hilfiger x Zendaya show danced to recorded music. An earlier version of this article incorrectly said they danced to live music. (Sept. 11, 2019)

FASHION BIG DATA TECHNOLOGY PLATFORM” NEXT SEPTEMBER IN PARIS

EPSI partner Warrant Hub, through their Belgian subsidiary company BeWarrant, organises the workshop in the framework of FBD_BModel.

FashionBD_Workshop-1024x724

EPSI has recently signed a partnership with Warrant Hub from the Tinexta Group, organisation offering integrated services for industrial projects and who has expertise in specific sectors such as advanced materials and carbon fibers for sport application.

Next 24th September, in Paris, our partners, through their Belgian Associate BeWarrant, will organise a specific workshop titled “Fashion Big Data Technology Platform – A way for developing new digital business models for the whole textile supply chain”.

The event is organised in in the framework of FBD_BModel Project, co-funded by the European Union through Horizon 2020 Research&Innovation Programme

READ MORE AND REGISTER HERE

CONTEXT

Internet, Big Data and Artificial Intelligence constitute the key technology drive for the future of fashion textile industry, permitting to create new business models for the whole supply chain.

In this workshop, we will report a novel fashion big data technology platform linking consumers’ needs and market demands with the manufacturing processes. This platform will enable the development of new business models for retailers (B2C) and business partners in the supply chain (B2B).

You will have the opportunities to learn about the latest technological innovations and how to develop your business with big data, establish new collaborations and ultimately define recommendations for the future funded research

ABSTRACT

The textile and clothing industry still occupy a crucial position in the manufacturing sector in Europe.

However, this industrial sector is challenged by a drastic reduction in Europe due to relocation to countries outside the EU with cheaper labour costs, leading to the reduction of manufacturing in Europe and leaving facilities as well as data and knowledge unexploited.

Supply chains in the EU are still too weak when facing international competition due to low levels of communication and cooperation between the concerned actors and lack of efficient tools for quick access to their target consumers. And the existing digital platforms can only process relatively simple interactions, in which B2B (interactions of professionals) and B2C (shopping with consumers) models have not been systematically integrated.

The FBD_BModel project, funded by the European Commission, aims at creating a digital technology platform for enabling small series innovative high value fashion and functional garments manufacturing and e-commerce, through a fully connected and data-driven local supply chain in the EU, to meet consumer’s personalized needs in terms of fashion and functional performances.

Based on this platform, a novel B2B2C business model will be built, helpful for creating customized textile production in Europe, promoting material innovations of European SMEs with connected professional networks, and preserving and updating professional knowledge in Europe.

FBD_BModel Consortium will meet academic and industrial stakeholders, to discuss research results and future developments for the development of novel supply chains supporting innovative services in fashion industry.

https://epsi.eu/news/fashion-big-data-technology-platform-next-september-in-paris/

15 INNOVATIONS SET TO CHANGE THE FASHION INDUSTRY?

15 INNOVATIONS SET TO CHANGE THE FASHION INDUSTRY?

Amsterdam – From biodegradable glitter to fabrics made from seaweed or orange fibres – these are the next generation innovators that will be supported by the Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator.

As of today, fifteen selected start-ups will follow a robust curriculum over the next twelve weeks including mentorship from the Accelerator’s partners adidas, C&A, Galeries Lafayette, Kering, Target and Zalando, with the aim to transform the fashion industry for good.

The Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator works to find and accelerate innovative technologies and business models that have the greatest potential to reshape the industry for good. The third batch of start-ups of the Accelerator Programme starts today 19 March in the Fashion for Good hub in Amsterdam.

The fifteen startups partaking in Batch 3 have been carefully selected out of hundreds of applicants, and come from all over the world covering 4 continents and 10 nationalities. They represent varied supply chain areas from alternative raw materials to new business models. For the next twelve weeks, the Accelerator’s partners and mentors will drive market validation of the innovators’ technologies, to prime them for implementation at scale. In addition, the start-ups are screened for potential funding to support development of their businesses.

The selected start-ups for the third edition of the Accelerator Programme are:

Algiknit, BioGlitz, circular.fashion, FLOCUS, Frumat, Good on You, Mango Materials, Nano Textile, Orange Fiber, PAPTIC, PlanetCare, Provenance, Reverse Resources, Scalable Garment Technologies and Style Lend. 

Fashion for Good was launched in 2017 and is supported by C&A Foundation as a founding partner. The Accelerator Programme is part of Fashion for Good’s Innovation Platform, which also includes a Scaling Programme and the Good Fashion Fund. The Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator is run in collaboration with Plug and Play – the world’s largest accelerator – and corporate partners adidas, C&A, Galeries Lafayette, Kering, Target and Zalando. Together they are championing the replicable and scalable innovations that will accelerate the transition to a circular fashion industry.

Graduation of the startups will take place on June 14th at the Fashion for Good hub in Amsterdam, where they will showcase their innovations to an audience of industry leaders and investors.

Third Batch Start-ups

Algiknit – Algiknit produces textile fibres extruded from kelp, a variety of seaweed. The extrusion process turns the biopolymer mixture into kelp-based thread that can be knitted or 3D printed to minimize waste. The final knitwear is biodegradable and can be dyed with natural pigments in a closed loop cycle.

BioGlitz – BioGlitz produces the world’s first biodegradable glitter. Based on a unique biodegradable formula made from eucalyptus tree extract, the eco-glitter is fully biodegradable, compostable and allows for the sustainable consumption of glitter without the environmental damage associated with micro plastics.

circular.fashion – circular.fashion has created a software that interconnects circular design, circular retail models and closed loop recycling technologies enables fashion brands to design circular garments. Circular clothes are attributed an identification tag that orchestrates a reverse supply chain network of consumers, sorting and recycling companies to close the loop to regenerated textiles.

FLOCUS – FLOCUS produces natural yarns, fillings and fabrics made from kapok fibres.

The kapok tree can be naturally grown without the use of pesticides and insecticide in arid soil not suitable for agricultural farming, offering a sustainable alternative to high water consumption natural fibre crops such as cotton.

Frumat – Frumat uses apples to create a leather-like material. Apple pectin is an industrial waste product which can be used to create sustainable materials that are totally compostable whilst still being durable enough to create luxury accessories. The materials can be dyed naturally and tanned without chemically intensive techniques.

Good on You – Good on You is a mobile app that provides ethical ratings for about 1,000 fashion brands rated on their impact on people, the planet and animals. It is built on a robust brand rating system which aggregates standards, certifications and publically available data sources into a simple, accessible 5-point score to promote transparency across the fashion industry and to allow customers to make conscious purchasing decisions.

Mango Materials – Mango Materials produces biodegradable bio-polyester that can be used as a sustainable alternative to the present polyester utilized in the fashion industry. Microfibres produced from the biopolyester can biodegraded in many environments, including landfills, wastewater treatment plants, and the oceans helping to prevent microfibre pollution and contributing to a closed-loop bio economy for the fashion industry.

Nano Textile – Nano Textile offers a sustainable alternative to binder chemicals normally used to attach finishes onto a fabric. Its technology embeds fabric finishes directly into fabric using a process called Cavitation and can apply to a range of products such as antibacterial & antiodor finishes or water repellency. This protects the end-user and the environment from the leaking of hazardous chemicals.

Orange Fiber – Orange Fiber manufactures natural fabrics from citrus by-products. Orange Fiber is made by extracting the cellulose from the fibres that are discarded from the industrial pressing and processing of oranges. The fibre, through nanotechnology techniques, is enriched with citrus fruit essential oils, creating a unique and sustainable fabric.

PAPTIC – PAPTIC manufactures bio-based alternative packaging materials that are made from sustainably sourced wood fibres. The material has the unique properties of paper and plastic commonly used in the retail sector, but with a much higher tear resistance than paper. The material can be recycled alongside cardboard.

PlanetCare – PlanetCare has developed a microfibre filter to be integrated in washing machines, that can capture microplastics before they are released in wastewater. The system works on the microfiltration of water based on electrically charged fibres and membrane nanotechnology. This technology contributes to reducing microplastics pollution ending up in the ocean.

Provenance Biofabrics – Provenance bio-engineers a true leather equivalent by programming the self-assembly of collagen molecules the building blocks of leather. This next generation fabric delivers an efficient and sustainable alternative to leather without harming animals.

Reverse Resources – Reverse Resources is a platform that enables fashion brands and garment manufacturers to address pre-consumer waste for industrial upcycling. The Software as a Service (SaaS) platform allows fabric and garment factories to map and measure leftover fabrics and scraps so that these become traceable through their

following life cycles. By mapping the waste material in the factory, these resources can eventually be reintroduced into the supply chain, limiting the use of virgin materials.

Scalable Garment Technologies Inc. – Scalable Garment Technologies Inc. (SGTI) has built a robotic knitting machine linked with 3D modelling software to make custom seamless knit garments. This new knitting technology enables digitization of the entire production process and on-demand manufacturing of custom seamless knit garments. This allows responsiveness to consumer demand while reducing waste.

Style Lend – Style Lend is a fashion rental marketplace. AI and machine learning is used to match users based on fit, as well as style. By renting out garments consumers can extend the life cycle of clothing and delay it from going into landfills.

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Notes to Editors

About Fashion for Good

Fashion for Good is the global initiative that is here to make all fashion good. We are a global platform for innovation, made possible through collaboration and community. With an open invitation to the entire apparel industry, Fashion for Good convenes brands, producers, retailers, suppliers, non-profit organisations, innovators and funders united in their shared ambition.

At the core of Fashion for Good is our innovation platform. Through our Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator, we give promising start-up innovators the expertise and access to funding they need in order to grow. Our Scaling Programme supports innovations that have passed the proof-of-concept phase, with a dedicated team that offers bespoke support and access to expertise, customers and capital. Finally, our Good Fashion Fund (in development) will catalyse access to finance where this is required to shift at scale to more sustainable production methods.

Additionally, Fashion for Good acts as a convener for change. From its first hub in Amsterdam, it houses a Circular Apparel Community co-working space, creates open-source resources like its Good Fashion Guide and welcomes visitors to join a collective movement to make fashion a force for good.

Fashion for Good was launched in 2017 with C&A Foundation as a founding partner. Its programmes are supported by corporate partners adidas, C&A, Galeries Lafayette Group, Kering, Target, Zalando, as well as organisations including the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, IDH – the Sustainable Trade Initiative, Impact Hub Amsterdam, McDonough Innovation, Plug and Play and the Sustainable Apparel Coalition.

About Plug and Play

Plug and Play is a global innovation platform. Headquartered in Silicon Valley, we have built accelerator programs, corporate innovation services, and an in-house VC to make technological advancement progress faster than ever before. Since inception in 2006, our programs have expanded worldwide to include a presence in 28 locations globally giving startups the necessary resources to succeed in Silicon Valley and beyond. With over 6,000 startups and 220 official corporate partners, we have created the ultimate startup ecosystem in many industries. We provide active investments with 200 leading Silicon Valley VCs, and host more than 700 networking events per year. Companies in our community have raised over $7 billion in funding, with successful portfolio exits including Danger, Dropbox, Lending Club, PayPal, SoundHound, and Zoosk.

Press Contact

Fashion for Good

Anne-Ro Klevant Groen

+31(0)6 15367875

press@fashionforgood.com

Accelerator Contact

Plug and Play

Isabelle Laurencin

accelerator@fashionforgood.com

Website

http://www.fashionforgood.com

http://www.fashionforgood.plugandplaytechcenter.com/

Social Media

Twitter:@FashionforGood

LinkedIn:Fashion for Good

Instagram: @fashionforgood

Facebook: FashionForGoodGlobal

15 Examples of How Technology Innovates Fashion

It was the great Coco Chanel who once said, “Fashion changes, but style endures.”Well, regardless of your thoughts on the matter, there’s another thing that changes along with fashion. It is technology. With the amount of innovationhappening these days, it kind of makes sense to bring the two together. After all, technology opens up so much more possibilities.

By combining style and functionality, there have been a few people who have taken fashion to the next level. From coats that can turn you into a mappable hotspot to dresses that will make you reconsider that little white lie, we’ve gathered a collection of 15 ongoing projects that could just be turned into reality.

We can’t say for certain if they’ll actually catch on but these futuristic fashion styles do look pretty awesome.

CHBL Jammer Coat

This coat is designed by an Austrian architecture company, Coop Himmelb(L)au and you can use it to disappear. Nope, it is not Harry Potter’s clock of insivibility. What happens is that the metallized fabrics block radio waves and makes the wearer untrackable from modern devices. It works great in a sense that your credit card information will be safe but this also means that you won’t be contactable via phone.

via Coop-himmelb(l)au
Rain Palette

Since acid rain remains a threat to public health nowadays, the Korean-born, London-based designer Dahea Sun had invented a natural cabbage dyed dress that could act as a pH indicator when rain falls onto the fabric. To take it even further, it even comes with a smartphone app that allows people to scan and upload colour changes to a cloud based database. This will update the rest of the world with real-time environmental data about the rain.

via Materiability
BB. Suit

Designed by Borre Akkersdijk, a Dutch textile developer, this prototype is basically the opposite of the Jammer Coat because it is embedded with copper wires that enable WiFi, GPS, NFC and Bluetooth that will turn you into a mappable hotspot with MP3 streaming capabilities. All those wires won’t hurt though as there are two layers of cotton to protect the copper wires inside, thus making it comfortable to wear.

via Adafruit
Karma Chameleon Project

What if your energy could be harnessed and used to change the display of a specific fabric? A group of researchers at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada have managed to weave electronic components into pieces of fabric to do just that. The result is illustrated in the picture below and as you can see, it’s something really cool. They’re even looking at other applications for this fabric as well, such as for charging and medical purposes. As more research is being conducted, this won’t be in retail stores any time soon.

via Bravenewgear
Gaze activated dress

This dress knows when you are looking at it. Embedded with eye-tracking technology, the dress responds to the human gaze. Gazing at the dress activates tiny motors which moves certain parts of it. One of the dresses is covered in tendrils of photo-luminescent threads that dangle from ruched fabrics while the other one is made up of glow-in-the-dark threads which forms a base layer.

via Urdesign
Intimacy 2.0

One look at the details of this dress and you can already tell just how provocative it’s meant to be. Throw some technology into the mix with opaque smart e-foils and the dress is taken to the next level. Oh did we mention that it becomes increasingly transparent when your heartbeat increases? This is one that makes a statement fashion wise and via its message of personal space too.

via Fashioningtech
The Unseen

How about clothing that responds to the weather around you? This jacket is treated with liquid crystal to make it respond to friction. Lauren Bowker does this by combining textiles and ink technology. A gust of wind or a ray of sunshine would have an effect on this beautiful piece of clothing, as indicated by the picture below.

via Wired
Living Pod

Ying Gao, the same Montreal fashion designer responsible for the Gaze Activated dresses, also created these dreses that look like they’re living and breathing. The folds of the dress curl and unfurl when exposed to light and the rate at which it moves changes with the light’s intensity as well. What’s great about this piece is how natural it moves.

via Fashioningtech
Wearable solar fashion

This is a handy one for the minimalists out there. Crystal solar panels are integrated into leather flaps on the jackets shoulders and waist so they can be revealed when there is sunshine and hidden when not in use. When worn in the full sun for an hour, it can store enough energy to charge a typical smartphone for up to 50% in capacity.

via Dezeen
Bubelle emotion sensing dress

This prototype by Philips Design gives us a look into the future of fashion where clothes does not merely to protect, but also reflect our emotions making it a forward form of communication. The first layer of the dress contains biometric sensors which projects emotion which comes in the form of colorful lights onto the second layer, the outer textile. It is both stunning and functional.

via Crunchwear
Holy dress

This garment punishes its wearer whenever a lie is told and is not invented for those who are weak in conscience. It has a speech recognition system, which constantly checks for lies. The dress will light up when you are talking, growing with intensity as the likeliness of a lie increases. If you have the guts to lie, it lights up and flickers while stunning you with an electric jolt as a repercussion.

via Melissa Coleman
Paparazzi lover

The name says it all really. Embedded with 62 LED lights that are sensitive to camera flashes, this dress lights up when it is photographed. This is a great way to remind the paparazzi who the real star is… the dress!

via Onascimento.com
DareDroid 2.0 Cocktailmaking Dress

Compared to the rest of the dresses, this one rewards another person and not the wearer of the outfit. If you’re interested in a refreshing cocktail, all you’d have to is play a touch screen version of ‘Truth or Dare’ and a combination of medical technology, customized hardware and human temperament will ensure that you get that well-deserved drink. However, get too close and the dress shuts down on you.

via V2
Smoke dress

At first glance, this dress will intrigue you merely by the flirty sparks. In essence, it is operated by a micro-controller-based, battery-driven sensory system that can detect when people are near you and releases smoke if they invade your personal space. How’s that for a warning sign for people to stay away?

via Toptenz.com
Robotic Spider Dress

Combining robotics and fashion, this dress has 6 robotic legs perched on the shoulders which responds to nearby movements. This piece of fashion also deals with the theme of ‘personal space’. It attracts the attention of those who are curious whilst protecting the user wearing the garment at the same time.

via Fashioningtech

 

Research

https://www.hongkiat.com/blog/innovative-tech-fashion/