The Best Runway Looks at New York Fashion Week Spring 2020

As the Spring 2020 collections hit the runways at New York Fashion Week, we’re keeping an eye on all the top looks defining the season. From the emerging trends to the standout pieces, we’re spotlighting the top five runway looks from the week’s standout collections. Consider it your ultimate sneak peek at the season ahead.

Marc Jacobs - Runway - September 2019 - New York Fashion Week

Tracking the standout looks from this week’s top collections

FASHION SHOWS

https://www.nyfw.com/

FASHION BIG DATA TECHNOLOGY PLATFORM” NEXT SEPTEMBER IN PARIS

EPSI partner Warrant Hub, through their Belgian subsidiary company BeWarrant, organises the workshop in the framework of FBD_BModel.

FashionBD_Workshop-1024x724

EPSI has recently signed a partnership with Warrant Hub from the Tinexta Group, organisation offering integrated services for industrial projects and who has expertise in specific sectors such as advanced materials and carbon fibers for sport application.

Next 24th September, in Paris, our partners, through their Belgian Associate BeWarrant, will organise a specific workshop titled “Fashion Big Data Technology Platform – A way for developing new digital business models for the whole textile supply chain”.

The event is organised in in the framework of FBD_BModel Project, co-funded by the European Union through Horizon 2020 Research&Innovation Programme

READ MORE AND REGISTER HERE

CONTEXT

Internet, Big Data and Artificial Intelligence constitute the key technology drive for the future of fashion textile industry, permitting to create new business models for the whole supply chain.

In this workshop, we will report a novel fashion big data technology platform linking consumers’ needs and market demands with the manufacturing processes. This platform will enable the development of new business models for retailers (B2C) and business partners in the supply chain (B2B).

You will have the opportunities to learn about the latest technological innovations and how to develop your business with big data, establish new collaborations and ultimately define recommendations for the future funded research

ABSTRACT

The textile and clothing industry still occupy a crucial position in the manufacturing sector in Europe.

However, this industrial sector is challenged by a drastic reduction in Europe due to relocation to countries outside the EU with cheaper labour costs, leading to the reduction of manufacturing in Europe and leaving facilities as well as data and knowledge unexploited.

Supply chains in the EU are still too weak when facing international competition due to low levels of communication and cooperation between the concerned actors and lack of efficient tools for quick access to their target consumers. And the existing digital platforms can only process relatively simple interactions, in which B2B (interactions of professionals) and B2C (shopping with consumers) models have not been systematically integrated.

The FBD_BModel project, funded by the European Commission, aims at creating a digital technology platform for enabling small series innovative high value fashion and functional garments manufacturing and e-commerce, through a fully connected and data-driven local supply chain in the EU, to meet consumer’s personalized needs in terms of fashion and functional performances.

Based on this platform, a novel B2B2C business model will be built, helpful for creating customized textile production in Europe, promoting material innovations of European SMEs with connected professional networks, and preserving and updating professional knowledge in Europe.

FBD_BModel Consortium will meet academic and industrial stakeholders, to discuss research results and future developments for the development of novel supply chains supporting innovative services in fashion industry.

https://epsi.eu/news/fashion-big-data-technology-platform-next-september-in-paris/

TomboyX has single-handedly changed my underwear standards forever with its comfortable, gender-inclusive styles

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TomboyX reviewTomboyX/Facebook
  • TomboyX strives to make underwear for everyone, regardless of their size or gender.
  • Like WildfangTomboyX has adapted traditionally masculine offerings for women’s bodies.
  • Their underwear is eco-friendly and sweatshop-free.
  • Their boyshorts, my favorite style, range in price from $18-$30 per pair.

TomboyX has been working to improve the inclusivity of the underwear industry since 2012.

Partners in both life and business, Fran Dunaway and Naomi Gonzalez set out to fill a unique hole in the market — “ underwear that any body could feel comfortable in, regardless of where they fell on the size or gender spectrum.”

A few months ago, Business Insider featured Wildfang, a brand that is designing masculine-style clothing tailored for women’s bodies. TomboyX is the underwear equivalent. The company took masculine-style underwear like trunks and boxer briefs and adapted them for women’s bodies, opening up underwear possibilities for those whose tastes fall outside traditional feminine styles.

TomboyX makes boxer briefs and trunks that maintain a masculine aesthetic while removing the excess fabric that often comes standard with men’s underwear to accommodate a … certain anatomy. This leads to a distinctly sleeker silhouette without the excess bulk that often leads to bunching or discomfort under tighter clothing.

I’ve worn men’s trunks or boxer briefs for the better part of my adult life, so I had grown used to the design shortcomings as a necessary evil to get the style I wanted. When I first heard about TomboyX, I jumped at the chance to try them. Initially, I went with its 4.5-inch trunks that, based on their online photos, seemed to be the closest option to the underwear I was used to wearing. I found them to be a little long for me, so I tried its slightly shorter option, the boy shorts, and I knew right away I’d found something here. When I tried them on, I wasn’t quite used to the fabric laying flush against my body, so it was a little strange at first. But after a few minutes I was totally used to it, and once I put pants on, I didn’t think another thought about my underwear that day, which is the ultimate goal, isn’t it?

TomboyX offers a wide range of styles, from 9-inch boxer briefs that come down to the mid-thigh all the way to more feminine styles such as bikinis and thongs. Size inclusivity is an unflinching tenant of the brand, so every item is offered in sizes from XS to 4X. What’s more is all its products are sweatshop-free and produced by workers that earn a living wage.

Additionally, TomboyX strives to be eco-friendly, with many of its products certified Standard 100 by Oeko-Tex, an international organization whose strict specifications ensure the human-ecological safety of textiles. This certification ensures limited levels of harmful chemicals in the fabric, which, if you ask me, is incredibly reassuring given underwear fabric’s proximity to sensitive areas.

TomboyX underwearTomboyX/Facebook

Of the fabric options offered — a basic cotton, MicroModal, and Active Drirelease — the cotton is my favorite (I’m not fancy). But the Active Drirelease is great if you’re an athlete or an avid gym-goer. I am neither, so they’re just another pair of underwear for me. The specialized fabric is sweat-resistant and moisture-wicking and has reinforced seams that will stand up to lots of stretch and movement. The MicroModals are criminally soft, and a bit lighter than the cotton ones, but I find them to be less breathable.

The cotton pairs feel the sturdiest to me, and while they’re not as soft as the MicroModal or as technologically advanced as the Active Drirelease, they are a bit less expensive. The cotton boyshorts run $23 per pair for solid colors or $25 for patterned pairs, the MicroModal boyshorts run $30 for solid colors or $32 for patterned pairs, and the Active Drirelease boyshorts run $30 for solid colors (no funky patterns yet in Active Drirelease). If that’s a bit too pricey, the also offer three-packs in basic colors from $42.

In my experience, none of the three fabric styles ride up at all.

With every other brand of trunk or boxer brief I’ve worn, it’s been a constant battle of trying to discreetly tug my underwear down to unbunch them. Imagine picking a wedgie, but with a higher degree of difficulty. TomboyX has managed to eliminate that problem entirely, at least in the boyshorts style I tried.

TomboyX brasTomboyX/Facebook

Naturally, TomboyX hasn’t abandoned underwear’s favorite companion — the bra. It offers four styles — two that mimic traditional sports bras in aesthetic and two more feminine bralettes. I tried the Essentials Soft Bra, one of the sports-bra styles, and while it was extremely comfy, it didn’t offer much support, so it wasn’t quite right for me. I prefer something with a little more compression, but my partner loves it as a casual lounge-around option or for wearing under T-shirts.

If you’re looking for more masculine style underwear, but want a sleeker aesthetic than traditional men’s underwear, TomboyX has finally answered your (and my) prayers.

Plus, you get the added benefits of undies that are eco-friendly, size inclusive, socially responsible — and most importantly, incredibly comfy. TomboyX checks all the boxes as the type of brand I love to support, and it’s single-handedly changed my underwear standards forever.

Shop all of the TomboyX styles here

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Find all the best offers at our Coupons page.

Disclosure: This post is brought to you by the Insider Picks team. We highlight products and services you might find interesting. If you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback.

Email us at insiderpicks@businessinsider.com

https://www.businessinsider.com/tomboyx-review

 

15 INNOVATIONS SET TO CHANGE THE FASHION INDUSTRY?

15 INNOVATIONS SET TO CHANGE THE FASHION INDUSTRY?

Amsterdam – From biodegradable glitter to fabrics made from seaweed or orange fibres – these are the next generation innovators that will be supported by the Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator.

As of today, fifteen selected start-ups will follow a robust curriculum over the next twelve weeks including mentorship from the Accelerator’s partners adidas, C&A, Galeries Lafayette, Kering, Target and Zalando, with the aim to transform the fashion industry for good.

The Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator works to find and accelerate innovative technologies and business models that have the greatest potential to reshape the industry for good. The third batch of start-ups of the Accelerator Programme starts today 19 March in the Fashion for Good hub in Amsterdam.

The fifteen startups partaking in Batch 3 have been carefully selected out of hundreds of applicants, and come from all over the world covering 4 continents and 10 nationalities. They represent varied supply chain areas from alternative raw materials to new business models. For the next twelve weeks, the Accelerator’s partners and mentors will drive market validation of the innovators’ technologies, to prime them for implementation at scale. In addition, the start-ups are screened for potential funding to support development of their businesses.

The selected start-ups for the third edition of the Accelerator Programme are:

Algiknit, BioGlitz, circular.fashion, FLOCUS, Frumat, Good on You, Mango Materials, Nano Textile, Orange Fiber, PAPTIC, PlanetCare, Provenance, Reverse Resources, Scalable Garment Technologies and Style Lend. 

Fashion for Good was launched in 2017 and is supported by C&A Foundation as a founding partner. The Accelerator Programme is part of Fashion for Good’s Innovation Platform, which also includes a Scaling Programme and the Good Fashion Fund. The Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator is run in collaboration with Plug and Play – the world’s largest accelerator – and corporate partners adidas, C&A, Galeries Lafayette, Kering, Target and Zalando. Together they are championing the replicable and scalable innovations that will accelerate the transition to a circular fashion industry.

Graduation of the startups will take place on June 14th at the Fashion for Good hub in Amsterdam, where they will showcase their innovations to an audience of industry leaders and investors.

Third Batch Start-ups

Algiknit – Algiknit produces textile fibres extruded from kelp, a variety of seaweed. The extrusion process turns the biopolymer mixture into kelp-based thread that can be knitted or 3D printed to minimize waste. The final knitwear is biodegradable and can be dyed with natural pigments in a closed loop cycle.

BioGlitz – BioGlitz produces the world’s first biodegradable glitter. Based on a unique biodegradable formula made from eucalyptus tree extract, the eco-glitter is fully biodegradable, compostable and allows for the sustainable consumption of glitter without the environmental damage associated with micro plastics.

circular.fashion – circular.fashion has created a software that interconnects circular design, circular retail models and closed loop recycling technologies enables fashion brands to design circular garments. Circular clothes are attributed an identification tag that orchestrates a reverse supply chain network of consumers, sorting and recycling companies to close the loop to regenerated textiles.

FLOCUS – FLOCUS produces natural yarns, fillings and fabrics made from kapok fibres.

The kapok tree can be naturally grown without the use of pesticides and insecticide in arid soil not suitable for agricultural farming, offering a sustainable alternative to high water consumption natural fibre crops such as cotton.

Frumat – Frumat uses apples to create a leather-like material. Apple pectin is an industrial waste product which can be used to create sustainable materials that are totally compostable whilst still being durable enough to create luxury accessories. The materials can be dyed naturally and tanned without chemically intensive techniques.

Good on You – Good on You is a mobile app that provides ethical ratings for about 1,000 fashion brands rated on their impact on people, the planet and animals. It is built on a robust brand rating system which aggregates standards, certifications and publically available data sources into a simple, accessible 5-point score to promote transparency across the fashion industry and to allow customers to make conscious purchasing decisions.

Mango Materials – Mango Materials produces biodegradable bio-polyester that can be used as a sustainable alternative to the present polyester utilized in the fashion industry. Microfibres produced from the biopolyester can biodegraded in many environments, including landfills, wastewater treatment plants, and the oceans helping to prevent microfibre pollution and contributing to a closed-loop bio economy for the fashion industry.

Nano Textile – Nano Textile offers a sustainable alternative to binder chemicals normally used to attach finishes onto a fabric. Its technology embeds fabric finishes directly into fabric using a process called Cavitation and can apply to a range of products such as antibacterial & antiodor finishes or water repellency. This protects the end-user and the environment from the leaking of hazardous chemicals.

Orange Fiber – Orange Fiber manufactures natural fabrics from citrus by-products. Orange Fiber is made by extracting the cellulose from the fibres that are discarded from the industrial pressing and processing of oranges. The fibre, through nanotechnology techniques, is enriched with citrus fruit essential oils, creating a unique and sustainable fabric.

PAPTIC – PAPTIC manufactures bio-based alternative packaging materials that are made from sustainably sourced wood fibres. The material has the unique properties of paper and plastic commonly used in the retail sector, but with a much higher tear resistance than paper. The material can be recycled alongside cardboard.

PlanetCare – PlanetCare has developed a microfibre filter to be integrated in washing machines, that can capture microplastics before they are released in wastewater. The system works on the microfiltration of water based on electrically charged fibres and membrane nanotechnology. This technology contributes to reducing microplastics pollution ending up in the ocean.

Provenance Biofabrics – Provenance bio-engineers a true leather equivalent by programming the self-assembly of collagen molecules the building blocks of leather. This next generation fabric delivers an efficient and sustainable alternative to leather without harming animals.

Reverse Resources – Reverse Resources is a platform that enables fashion brands and garment manufacturers to address pre-consumer waste for industrial upcycling. The Software as a Service (SaaS) platform allows fabric and garment factories to map and measure leftover fabrics and scraps so that these become traceable through their

following life cycles. By mapping the waste material in the factory, these resources can eventually be reintroduced into the supply chain, limiting the use of virgin materials.

Scalable Garment Technologies Inc. – Scalable Garment Technologies Inc. (SGTI) has built a robotic knitting machine linked with 3D modelling software to make custom seamless knit garments. This new knitting technology enables digitization of the entire production process and on-demand manufacturing of custom seamless knit garments. This allows responsiveness to consumer demand while reducing waste.

Style Lend – Style Lend is a fashion rental marketplace. AI and machine learning is used to match users based on fit, as well as style. By renting out garments consumers can extend the life cycle of clothing and delay it from going into landfills.

__

Notes to Editors

About Fashion for Good

Fashion for Good is the global initiative that is here to make all fashion good. We are a global platform for innovation, made possible through collaboration and community. With an open invitation to the entire apparel industry, Fashion for Good convenes brands, producers, retailers, suppliers, non-profit organisations, innovators and funders united in their shared ambition.

At the core of Fashion for Good is our innovation platform. Through our Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator, we give promising start-up innovators the expertise and access to funding they need in order to grow. Our Scaling Programme supports innovations that have passed the proof-of-concept phase, with a dedicated team that offers bespoke support and access to expertise, customers and capital. Finally, our Good Fashion Fund (in development) will catalyse access to finance where this is required to shift at scale to more sustainable production methods.

Additionally, Fashion for Good acts as a convener for change. From its first hub in Amsterdam, it houses a Circular Apparel Community co-working space, creates open-source resources like its Good Fashion Guide and welcomes visitors to join a collective movement to make fashion a force for good.

Fashion for Good was launched in 2017 with C&A Foundation as a founding partner. Its programmes are supported by corporate partners adidas, C&A, Galeries Lafayette Group, Kering, Target, Zalando, as well as organisations including the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, IDH – the Sustainable Trade Initiative, Impact Hub Amsterdam, McDonough Innovation, Plug and Play and the Sustainable Apparel Coalition.

About Plug and Play

Plug and Play is a global innovation platform. Headquartered in Silicon Valley, we have built accelerator programs, corporate innovation services, and an in-house VC to make technological advancement progress faster than ever before. Since inception in 2006, our programs have expanded worldwide to include a presence in 28 locations globally giving startups the necessary resources to succeed in Silicon Valley and beyond. With over 6,000 startups and 220 official corporate partners, we have created the ultimate startup ecosystem in many industries. We provide active investments with 200 leading Silicon Valley VCs, and host more than 700 networking events per year. Companies in our community have raised over $7 billion in funding, with successful portfolio exits including Danger, Dropbox, Lending Club, PayPal, SoundHound, and Zoosk.

Press Contact

Fashion for Good

Anne-Ro Klevant Groen

+31(0)6 15367875

press@fashionforgood.com

Accelerator Contact

Plug and Play

Isabelle Laurencin

accelerator@fashionforgood.com

Website

http://www.fashionforgood.com

http://www.fashionforgood.plugandplaytechcenter.com/

Social Media

Twitter:@FashionforGood

LinkedIn:Fashion for Good

Instagram: @fashionforgood

Facebook: FashionForGoodGlobal

Meet 6 Businesses Changing the Canadian Fashion Industry in “Shaping the Six”

It’s been 6 years strong for Fashion Zone, and we caught up with 6 of our all-star businesses to hear their Fashion Zone stories
By: Kelvin Li
July 31, 2019

July is a big moment for Fashion Zone, as this month marks our 6 year anniversary since opening doors in 2013. What started as 3 enrolled companies has now grown to a community of over 160 companies and over 1200 total members. Our network and our impact continues to grow, with Fashion Zone companies creating 1018 jobs, and achieving total revenues over $129 million dollars.

In celebration of our 6 years, we are excited to release “Shaping the Six” – a feature of six successful Fashion Zone companies and their Fashion Zone stories.

Credits:
Photographer: Freya de Tonnancour, external link
Videographer: Kelvin Li, external link

2020 Armor

Meet 2020 Armor’s Ali Ghafour – the makers of the premier electronic vest and app for martial arts training and scoring.

“I’ve never built anything physical, and we create electronic vests. One of the things we had to do was do a tech pack. I did not know what a tech pack was for the vest itself so our manufacturers can actually build it for us. We didn’t have that skill set at all, so it was crucial to have access to that equipment and that talent that can create this tech pack for us which is essential for us to build our actual product.

So I’m used to working in an environment where it’s just computers – you don’t actually have to work on anything physical. And then coming to a space where there is fabric, pad printers, and 3d printers, and having that accessible, and so I felt an immediate sense of comfort that we’re in the right space for us to move forward.

Founder and CEO Ali Ghafour’s advice to new and prospective members? “Everything is a resource for you to exploit, so don’t expect the resources to ask you what you need.“

Ali Ghafour, Founder

Finley

Meet Finley Jewelry’s Nathan and Kathleen, a sustainable jewelry powerhouse.

“Coming in every day and looking forward to seeing people, being our own team or the people at Fashion Zone. I think everyone is very helpful in the Fashion Zone, the teams have very good energy. You don’t always talk to people because you’re always busy doing your own thing, but it’s good to know that you can just turn your head and say hey to someone and they will definitely reciprocate that positive energy that you do.

Co-founders Kathleen and Nathan have been working on Finley for just shy of two years. Their advice to individuals interested in applying to an accelerator?

“Do it. Definitely. I think that it’s always scary applying to these incubators, and accelerators, and you might feel like your product isn’t there yet, or your business is too early. But I strongly recommend starting the process earlier on because there is so much growth to be had and even if you have an established business coming to the Fashion Zone. I believe that if you haven’t already done it, you should be doing it.

If you are lucky enough to get in, make sure you put 100% don’t come in here and say I have this space and let me just lounge around. You come in here and put 100%  make sure you communicate to the staff and let them know what you need because if you don’t put in anything, you won’t get anything back. It’s all about reciprocity at the Fashion Zone.”

Kathleen Chan and Nathan Tran Trinh, Founders

Authentic or Not

Meet Authentic or Not, leaders in product authentication and connective product technologies.

“It’s very fashionable. Everyone is dressed up very well. I used to come in track pants, and now I come in a 3 piece suit. I found a community that was welcoming and everyone was rooting for each other and wanting to help each other out. My first impression was help everywhere and just a lot of resources, so that’s when I knew that I wanted to stay here as long as I can until you guys kick me out.

The mentors and advisors, that was gold to me. They gave me good inside, really helped shape where the tech was going. It’s the place to be  if you want to thrive in the fashion industry.”

Ahmer Beg, Founder

Odessu

Meet Odessu’s Leon, an award-winning technology company that makes shopping for the right fit as easy as a browser extension.

“When I heard about the Fashion Zone, I thought it would be a really cool opportunity for me to be around company is within the same industry. I was very impressed to find that the Fashion Zone is not just clothing, it’s also retail, tech, accessories, shoes, and platforms to sell those. So that allowed me to learn more about branding and marketing. And so I really thought with all of the workshops that Fashion Zone was offering that it would be a great home for Odessu as well.

The advisors have been a really big segment. Having an in-house advisor like Olena be there for me anytime I needed to ask a question. I remember there were a couple of weeks where I would go in a 3 days a week for an hour and sit down with her and have these ideas back and forth, that was a really cool thing.”

Founder Leon Nsengiyumva’s advice to others?

“Use it to most of your ability. I think it has a great network, and I think as far as marketing, branding, and shipping, these are things that Fashion Zone has connections with to third party companies, has awesome people come to talk and give you feedback. And if you’re aware of when these things are happening, you can just benefit so much and learn so quickly.”

Leon Nsengiyumva, Founder

Inlighten

Meet Eddy from Inlighten – creators of the world’s best and brightest fiber optic light-up apparel.

“The Fashion Zone is a very busy place. A lot of things are happening, people are chit-chatting. It’s very alive. It’s overall a very positive vibe. I really enjoy having conversations with people here because everyone is easy going, very upbeat. They all have very good ideas  and are brilliant brilliant minds. I learn a lot from people here, and I know that I am in the right place. It’s somewhere that is hard to leave.

I think it’s very comprehensive. And I think one of the best things Fashion Zone’s efforts is that Fashion Zone really tries to listen to what the members are saying, what the members really want. When I needed help with tax, they held tax workshops. When I needed help with marketing, there are marketing workshops. I think one of the best things that Fashion Zone offers is being responsive.”

Eddy Song, Founder

Passen

Meet Stuart from Passen – new age body measuring technologies that brings unprecedented ease and accuracy to shopping in-stores and online

“Day 1 It was kind of exciting. All these new people. And getting into the same physical space as these people that are at a similar stage of their lives and the company they are working on. Meeting all the staff members, it was a fond and memorable time. It’s nice to be around people who are going through a similar experience as you. To be able to be around people who truly empathize with the craziness that entrepreneurship is comforting.

For Passen, a general theme has been exposure. All of the different opportunities to showcase our company and our solutions. Like the space for showcasing in April, bringing people through having a curated experience.

Talking to other entrepreneurs has probably been the most valuable. When it’s 11 PM on a Wednesday and there’s another person sitting across the room hunched over their computer, there’s kind of empathy and curiosity and like “What are you working on?” So you start talking and they start telling you their story and they start telling you their challenges, those connections have been the most valuable.”

Stuart’s advice to our readers?

“Do it. Go through the process and meet the people and see what it has to offer by taking the first step and applying. It’s been incredibly valuable. You learn and meet people.”

Stuart Campbell, Founder

search https://www.ryerson.ca/fashion-zone/news-events/2019/07/shaping-the-six/?fbclid=IwAR0puaTbBxiW3-aN27dYnH8vNWw9_xYDBorqXKqeptnC5-gMqSYRvFBmHLw

15 Examples of How Technology Innovates Fashion

It was the great Coco Chanel who once said, “Fashion changes, but style endures.”Well, regardless of your thoughts on the matter, there’s another thing that changes along with fashion. It is technology. With the amount of innovationhappening these days, it kind of makes sense to bring the two together. After all, technology opens up so much more possibilities.

By combining style and functionality, there have been a few people who have taken fashion to the next level. From coats that can turn you into a mappable hotspot to dresses that will make you reconsider that little white lie, we’ve gathered a collection of 15 ongoing projects that could just be turned into reality.

We can’t say for certain if they’ll actually catch on but these futuristic fashion styles do look pretty awesome.

CHBL Jammer Coat

This coat is designed by an Austrian architecture company, Coop Himmelb(L)au and you can use it to disappear. Nope, it is not Harry Potter’s clock of insivibility. What happens is that the metallized fabrics block radio waves and makes the wearer untrackable from modern devices. It works great in a sense that your credit card information will be safe but this also means that you won’t be contactable via phone.

via Coop-himmelb(l)au
Rain Palette

Since acid rain remains a threat to public health nowadays, the Korean-born, London-based designer Dahea Sun had invented a natural cabbage dyed dress that could act as a pH indicator when rain falls onto the fabric. To take it even further, it even comes with a smartphone app that allows people to scan and upload colour changes to a cloud based database. This will update the rest of the world with real-time environmental data about the rain.

via Materiability
BB. Suit

Designed by Borre Akkersdijk, a Dutch textile developer, this prototype is basically the opposite of the Jammer Coat because it is embedded with copper wires that enable WiFi, GPS, NFC and Bluetooth that will turn you into a mappable hotspot with MP3 streaming capabilities. All those wires won’t hurt though as there are two layers of cotton to protect the copper wires inside, thus making it comfortable to wear.

via Adafruit
Karma Chameleon Project

What if your energy could be harnessed and used to change the display of a specific fabric? A group of researchers at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada have managed to weave electronic components into pieces of fabric to do just that. The result is illustrated in the picture below and as you can see, it’s something really cool. They’re even looking at other applications for this fabric as well, such as for charging and medical purposes. As more research is being conducted, this won’t be in retail stores any time soon.

via Bravenewgear
Gaze activated dress

This dress knows when you are looking at it. Embedded with eye-tracking technology, the dress responds to the human gaze. Gazing at the dress activates tiny motors which moves certain parts of it. One of the dresses is covered in tendrils of photo-luminescent threads that dangle from ruched fabrics while the other one is made up of glow-in-the-dark threads which forms a base layer.

via Urdesign
Intimacy 2.0

One look at the details of this dress and you can already tell just how provocative it’s meant to be. Throw some technology into the mix with opaque smart e-foils and the dress is taken to the next level. Oh did we mention that it becomes increasingly transparent when your heartbeat increases? This is one that makes a statement fashion wise and via its message of personal space too.

via Fashioningtech
The Unseen

How about clothing that responds to the weather around you? This jacket is treated with liquid crystal to make it respond to friction. Lauren Bowker does this by combining textiles and ink technology. A gust of wind or a ray of sunshine would have an effect on this beautiful piece of clothing, as indicated by the picture below.

via Wired
Living Pod

Ying Gao, the same Montreal fashion designer responsible for the Gaze Activated dresses, also created these dreses that look like they’re living and breathing. The folds of the dress curl and unfurl when exposed to light and the rate at which it moves changes with the light’s intensity as well. What’s great about this piece is how natural it moves.

via Fashioningtech
Wearable solar fashion

This is a handy one for the minimalists out there. Crystal solar panels are integrated into leather flaps on the jackets shoulders and waist so they can be revealed when there is sunshine and hidden when not in use. When worn in the full sun for an hour, it can store enough energy to charge a typical smartphone for up to 50% in capacity.

via Dezeen
Bubelle emotion sensing dress

This prototype by Philips Design gives us a look into the future of fashion where clothes does not merely to protect, but also reflect our emotions making it a forward form of communication. The first layer of the dress contains biometric sensors which projects emotion which comes in the form of colorful lights onto the second layer, the outer textile. It is both stunning and functional.

via Crunchwear
Holy dress

This garment punishes its wearer whenever a lie is told and is not invented for those who are weak in conscience. It has a speech recognition system, which constantly checks for lies. The dress will light up when you are talking, growing with intensity as the likeliness of a lie increases. If you have the guts to lie, it lights up and flickers while stunning you with an electric jolt as a repercussion.

via Melissa Coleman
Paparazzi lover

The name says it all really. Embedded with 62 LED lights that are sensitive to camera flashes, this dress lights up when it is photographed. This is a great way to remind the paparazzi who the real star is… the dress!

via Onascimento.com
DareDroid 2.0 Cocktailmaking Dress

Compared to the rest of the dresses, this one rewards another person and not the wearer of the outfit. If you’re interested in a refreshing cocktail, all you’d have to is play a touch screen version of ‘Truth or Dare’ and a combination of medical technology, customized hardware and human temperament will ensure that you get that well-deserved drink. However, get too close and the dress shuts down on you.

via V2
Smoke dress

At first glance, this dress will intrigue you merely by the flirty sparks. In essence, it is operated by a micro-controller-based, battery-driven sensory system that can detect when people are near you and releases smoke if they invade your personal space. How’s that for a warning sign for people to stay away?

via Toptenz.com
Robotic Spider Dress

Combining robotics and fashion, this dress has 6 robotic legs perched on the shoulders which responds to nearby movements. This piece of fashion also deals with the theme of ‘personal space’. It attracts the attention of those who are curious whilst protecting the user wearing the garment at the same time.

via Fashioningtech

 

Research

https://www.hongkiat.com/blog/innovative-tech-fashion/

STREET STYLE

35 Street Style Stars Every Fashion Lover Should Know  by 

It’s pretty clear that the phenomenon of street style is here to stay. Just one quick pass in front of any given show during Fashion Week, and—for better or worse—you’ll witnesses scores of preening style-setters getting snapped by international photographers. And, as a result, we have a new breed of fashion celebrities known as street style stars.

Back in 2012, we created this very list, and almost three years later, we felt it was time to give it an overhaul with new faces (and outfits), updated photos, and new facts.

While several folks on our original list have stood the test of time and have only gotten more recognizable (ahem, Mirsoslava DumaGiovanna Battaglia, and Anna Dello Russo), others seemed to have fallen off fashion’s radar a bit, likely thanks to the idea that a lifestyle of endless fashion shows, designer items, and international jet-setting is probably difficult to sustain.

MORE: 21 Women Who Make Us Want to Dress Better

That said, a new crop of style stars have infiltrated the scene, so check out this revamped list (in no particular order) of 35 street style stars you should know as we head into Fashion Month—from established editors to faces you’ve probably seen but can’t quite place.

Searches : http://stylecaster.com/ultimate-guide-50-street-style-allstars/

Read more: http://stylecaster.com/ultimate-guide-50-street-style-allstars/#ixzz5AZeIOCDi

STREET STYLE HAS BECOME JUST AS MAJOR AS THE RUNWAY SHOWS THEMSELVES. CHECK OUT THESE STREET STYLE STARS FOR FASHION INSPIRATION. 

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