SHOP THE BIOMIMICRY DIGITAL COLLECTION

Auroboros is the first fashion house to merge science and technology with physical haute couture, as well as digital-only ready-to-wear. Creating a romantic premise for the near-future, our work stands for innovation, sustainability and immersive design. 

We seek to evolve the luxury industry into deeper dimensions – redefining how we imagine, design and affect clothing consumption. With this, we are shaping new discussions around the idea of a utopian future and its relationship to the human body.

Auroboros is a member of artists at The Sarabande Foundation: Founded by Lee Alexander McQueen. 

Education, research and development are fundamental principles at Auroboros. We are proud and continue to be affiliated with numerous internationally-renowned educational establishments.

Via lectures and workshops, Auroboros encourages and educates the next generation of creatives to rethink and challenge the future. For enquires, please contact us.

https://www.auroboros.co.uk/

https://www.auroboros.co.uk/product-page/fibonacci-look

How Digital Fashion Could Replace Fast Fashion, And The Startup Paving The Way

Brooke Roberts-Islam Senior Contributor Retail

The fashion industry is going through a somewhat painful transition from analog to digital, induced by the coronavirus pandemic and the relentless rise in global temperatures, triggering climate change an increasing pressure on the industry to become more sustainable. To continue to trade in the face of these challenges, fashion brands have adopted digital methods of prototyping, thereby reducing waste and lead times and streamlining physical production post-lockdown. While such global brands adapt, other fashion industry visionaries are reinventing. Viewing the current fashion industry challenges within the context of shifting consumer desires and online behaviors, two fashion entrepreneurs are devising an entirely new business model for fashion consumption, with no physical outputs. The model is the culmination of the learnings of two fashion entrepreneurs who spearheaded Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in Kyiv, Ukraine, propelling emerging fashion designers from around the globe into international boutiques via their B2B wholesale fashion showroom, More Dash.

From their industry vantage point, founders Daria Shapovalova and Natalia Modenova have witnessed a rapidly changing fashion market since launching the More Dash wholesale showroom, headquartered in Paris, in 014. In their first B2C fashion venture in 2019 they launched More Dash pop up shops in the US (firstly in LA) as an AB test for this hypothesis: there is a significant demand for fashion ‘consumption’ for the sole purpose of digital content creation, meaning that purchasing and physical ownership for these ‘consumers’ is at least partially redundant.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/brookerobertsislam/2020/08/21/how-digital-fashion-could-replace-fast-fashion-and-the-startup-paving-the-way/?sh=36dc22eb70d8

15 innovations changing the fashion world

From biodegradable glitter to fabrics made from seaweed or orange fibres – these are the next generation of fashion innovators. Algiknit, BioGlitz, circular.fashion, FLOCUS, Frumat, Good on You, Mango Materials, Nano Textile, Orange Fibre, PAPTIC, PlanetCare, Provenance, Reverse Resources, Scalable Garment Technologies and Style Lend are brands working hard to transform the fashion industry for good.

 

Fifteen selected start-ups are offering a better future to the fashion industry. That is why they are actually being supported by the Fashion for Good-Plug and Play Accelerator through partners like Adidas, C&A, Galeries Lafayette, Kering, Target and Zalando.

Algiknit, BioGlitz, circular.fashion, FLOCUS, Frumat, Good on You, Mango Materials, Nano Textile, Orange Fibre, PAPTIC, PlanetCare, Provenance, Reverse Resources, Scalable Garment Technologies and Style Lend represent varied supply chain areas -from alternative raw materials to new business models-. But, who are them? What kind of innovations are they offering?

 

A better future for fashion

Algiknit. It produces textile fibres extruded from kelp, a variety of seaweed. The extrusion process turns the biopolymer mixture into kelp-based thread that can be knitted or 3D printed to minimize waste. The final knitwear is biodegradable and can be dyed with natural pigments in a closed loop cycle.

 

BioGlitz. This company produces the world’s first biodegradable glitter. Based on a unique biodegradable formula made from eucalyptus tree extract, the eco-glitter is fully biodegradable, compostable and allows for the sustainable consumption of glitter without the environmental damage associated with micro plastics.

 

circular.fashion. It has created a software that interconnects circular design, circular retail models and closed loop recycling technologies enables fashion brands to design circular garments. Circular clothes are attributed an identification tag that orchestrates a reverse supply chain network of consumers, sorting and recycling companies to close the loop to regenerated textiles.

 

Flocus. The company produces natural yarns, fillings and fabrics made from kapok fibres. The kapok tree can be naturally grown without the use of pesticides and insecticide in arid soil not suitable for agricultural farming, offering a sustainable alternative to high water consumption natural fibre crops such as cotton.

 

Frumat. The brand uses apples to create a leather-like material. Apple pectin is an industrial waste product which can be used to create sustainable materials that are totally compostable whilst still being durable enough to create luxury accessories. The leathers can be dyed naturally and tanned without chemically intensive techniques.

Good on You. This mobile app provides ethical ratings for about 1,000 fashion brands rated on their impact on people, the planet and animals. It is built on a robust brand rating system which aggregates standards, certifications and publically available data sources into a simple, accessible 5-point score to promote transparency across the fashion industry and to allow customers to make conscious purchasing decisions.

 

Mango Materials. The company produces biodegradable bio-polyester that can be used as a sustainable alternative to the present polyester utilized in the fashion industry. Microfibres produced from the biopolyester can biodegraded in many environments, including landfills, wastewater treatment plants, and the oceans helping to prevent microfibre pollution and contributing to a closed-loop bio economy for the fashion industry.

 

Nano Textile. It offers a sustainable alternative to binder chemicals normally used to attach finishes onto a fabric.  Its technology embeds fabric finishes directly into fabric using a process called Cavitation and can apply to a range of products such as antibacterial & antiodor finishes or water repellency. This protects the end-user and the environment from the leaking of hazardous chemicals.

 

Orange Fiber. This Italian company manufactures natural fabrics from citrus by-products. Orange Fiber is made by extracting the cellulose from the fibres that are discarded from the industrial pressing and processing of oranges. The fibre, through nanotechnology techniques, is enriched with citrus fruit essential oils, creating a unique and sustainable fabric.

 

PAPTIC. It manufactures bio-based alternative packaging materials that are made from sustainably sourced wood fibres. The material has the unique properties of paper and plastic commonly used in the retail sector, but with a much higher tear resistance than paper. The material can be recycled alongside cardboard.

 

PlanetCare. It has developed a microfibre filter to be integrated in washing machines, that can capture microplastics before they are released in wastewater. The system works on the microfiltration of water based on electrically charged fibres and membrane nanotechnology. This technology contributes to reducing microplastics pollution ending up in the ocean.

 

Provenance Biofabrics. Provenance bio-engineers offer a true leather equivalent by programming the self-assembly of collagen molecules the building blocks of leather. This next generation fabric delivers a more efficient and sustainable alternative to leather without harming animals.

 

Reverse Resources. This platform enables fashion brands and garment manufacturers to address pre-consumer waste for industrial upcycling.  The Software as a Service (SaaS) platform allows fabric and garment factories to map and measure leftover fabrics and scraps so that these become traceable through their following life cycles. By mapping the waste material in the factory, these resources can eventually be reintroduced into the supply chain, limiting the use of virgin materials.

 

Scalable Garment Technologies Inc. SGTI has built a robotic knitting machine linked with 3D modelling software to make custom seamless knit garments. This new knitting technology enables digitization of the entire production process and on-demand manufacturing of custom seamless knit garments. This allows responsiveness to consumer demand while reducing waste.

 

Style Lend. It is a fashion rental marketplace. AI and machine learning is used to match users based on fit, as well as style.  By renting out garments consumers can extend the life cycle of clothing and delay it from going into landfills.

+ info: Fashion for Good

15 innovations changing the fashion world

About the Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action

Under the auspices of UN Climate Change, fashion stakeholders worked during 2018 to identify ways in which the broader textile, clothing and fashion industry can move towards an holistic commitment to climate action. They created the Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action which contains the vision to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. The Fashion Industry Charter was launched at COP24 in Katowice, Poland, in December 2018.

The Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action goes beyond previous industry-wide commitments. It includes a target of 30% GHG emission reductions by 2030 and a commitment to analyze and set a decarbonization pathway for the fashion industry drawing on methodologies from the Science-Based Targets Initiative. This target – which is one of many goals enshrined in the Charter – is a clear demonstration that the fashion industry is serious about urgently acting on climate change and is keen to set an example to other sectors around the level of commitment required to meet the scale of the climate challenge.

Under UN Climate Change, the Signatories and Supporting Organizations of the Charter will work collaboratively to deliver on the principles enshrined in the document. This will be done through Working Groups, which will bring together relevant stakeholders, experts and initiatives in the fashion and broader textile sector.

The Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action, with its Working Groups, will identify and amplify best practices, strengthen existing efforts, identify and address gaps, facilitate and strengthen collaboration among relevant stakeholders, and join resources and share tools to enable the sector to achieve its climate targets.

The industry charter specifies the following overarching areas of work to be further developed by specific Working Groups:

  • Decarbonization pathway and GHG emission reductions
  • Raw material
  • Manufacturing/Energy
  • Logistics
  • Policy engagement
  • Leveraging existing tools and initiatives
  • Promoting broader climate action

Read the full text of the Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action.

For more information, please consult our frequently asked questions.

https://unfccc.int/climate-action/sectoral-engagement/global-climate-action-in-fashion/about-the-fashion-industry-charter-for-climate-action

TomboyX has single-handedly changed my underwear standards forever with its comfortable, gender-inclusive styles

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TomboyX reviewTomboyX/Facebook
  • TomboyX strives to make underwear for everyone, regardless of their size or gender.
  • Like WildfangTomboyX has adapted traditionally masculine offerings for women’s bodies.
  • Their underwear is eco-friendly and sweatshop-free.
  • Their boyshorts, my favorite style, range in price from $18-$30 per pair.

TomboyX has been working to improve the inclusivity of the underwear industry since 2012.

Partners in both life and business, Fran Dunaway and Naomi Gonzalez set out to fill a unique hole in the market — “ underwear that any body could feel comfortable in, regardless of where they fell on the size or gender spectrum.”

A few months ago, Business Insider featured Wildfang, a brand that is designing masculine-style clothing tailored for women’s bodies. TomboyX is the underwear equivalent. The company took masculine-style underwear like trunks and boxer briefs and adapted them for women’s bodies, opening up underwear possibilities for those whose tastes fall outside traditional feminine styles.

TomboyX makes boxer briefs and trunks that maintain a masculine aesthetic while removing the excess fabric that often comes standard with men’s underwear to accommodate a … certain anatomy. This leads to a distinctly sleeker silhouette without the excess bulk that often leads to bunching or discomfort under tighter clothing.

I’ve worn men’s trunks or boxer briefs for the better part of my adult life, so I had grown used to the design shortcomings as a necessary evil to get the style I wanted. When I first heard about TomboyX, I jumped at the chance to try them. Initially, I went with its 4.5-inch trunks that, based on their online photos, seemed to be the closest option to the underwear I was used to wearing. I found them to be a little long for me, so I tried its slightly shorter option, the boy shorts, and I knew right away I’d found something here. When I tried them on, I wasn’t quite used to the fabric laying flush against my body, so it was a little strange at first. But after a few minutes I was totally used to it, and once I put pants on, I didn’t think another thought about my underwear that day, which is the ultimate goal, isn’t it?

TomboyX offers a wide range of styles, from 9-inch boxer briefs that come down to the mid-thigh all the way to more feminine styles such as bikinis and thongs. Size inclusivity is an unflinching tenant of the brand, so every item is offered in sizes from XS to 4X. What’s more is all its products are sweatshop-free and produced by workers that earn a living wage.

Additionally, TomboyX strives to be eco-friendly, with many of its products certified Standard 100 by Oeko-Tex, an international organization whose strict specifications ensure the human-ecological safety of textiles. This certification ensures limited levels of harmful chemicals in the fabric, which, if you ask me, is incredibly reassuring given underwear fabric’s proximity to sensitive areas.

TomboyX underwearTomboyX/Facebook

Of the fabric options offered — a basic cotton, MicroModal, and Active Drirelease — the cotton is my favorite (I’m not fancy). But the Active Drirelease is great if you’re an athlete or an avid gym-goer. I am neither, so they’re just another pair of underwear for me. The specialized fabric is sweat-resistant and moisture-wicking and has reinforced seams that will stand up to lots of stretch and movement. The MicroModals are criminally soft, and a bit lighter than the cotton ones, but I find them to be less breathable.

The cotton pairs feel the sturdiest to me, and while they’re not as soft as the MicroModal or as technologically advanced as the Active Drirelease, they are a bit less expensive. The cotton boyshorts run $23 per pair for solid colors or $25 for patterned pairs, the MicroModal boyshorts run $30 for solid colors or $32 for patterned pairs, and the Active Drirelease boyshorts run $30 for solid colors (no funky patterns yet in Active Drirelease). If that’s a bit too pricey, the also offer three-packs in basic colors from $42.

In my experience, none of the three fabric styles ride up at all.

With every other brand of trunk or boxer brief I’ve worn, it’s been a constant battle of trying to discreetly tug my underwear down to unbunch them. Imagine picking a wedgie, but with a higher degree of difficulty. TomboyX has managed to eliminate that problem entirely, at least in the boyshorts style I tried.

TomboyX brasTomboyX/Facebook

Naturally, TomboyX hasn’t abandoned underwear’s favorite companion — the bra. It offers four styles — two that mimic traditional sports bras in aesthetic and two more feminine bralettes. I tried the Essentials Soft Bra, one of the sports-bra styles, and while it was extremely comfy, it didn’t offer much support, so it wasn’t quite right for me. I prefer something with a little more compression, but my partner loves it as a casual lounge-around option or for wearing under T-shirts.

If you’re looking for more masculine style underwear, but want a sleeker aesthetic than traditional men’s underwear, TomboyX has finally answered your (and my) prayers.

Plus, you get the added benefits of undies that are eco-friendly, size inclusive, socially responsible — and most importantly, incredibly comfy. TomboyX checks all the boxes as the type of brand I love to support, and it’s single-handedly changed my underwear standards forever.

Shop all of the TomboyX styles here

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Find all the best offers at our Coupons page.

Disclosure: This post is brought to you by the Insider Picks team. We highlight products and services you might find interesting. If you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback.

Email us at insiderpicks@businessinsider.com

https://www.businessinsider.com/tomboyx-review

 

STREET STYLE

35 Street Style Stars Every Fashion Lover Should Know  by 

It’s pretty clear that the phenomenon of street style is here to stay. Just one quick pass in front of any given show during Fashion Week, and—for better or worse—you’ll witnesses scores of preening style-setters getting snapped by international photographers. And, as a result, we have a new breed of fashion celebrities known as street style stars.

Back in 2012, we created this very list, and almost three years later, we felt it was time to give it an overhaul with new faces (and outfits), updated photos, and new facts.

While several folks on our original list have stood the test of time and have only gotten more recognizable (ahem, Mirsoslava DumaGiovanna Battaglia, and Anna Dello Russo), others seemed to have fallen off fashion’s radar a bit, likely thanks to the idea that a lifestyle of endless fashion shows, designer items, and international jet-setting is probably difficult to sustain.

MORE: 21 Women Who Make Us Want to Dress Better

That said, a new crop of style stars have infiltrated the scene, so check out this revamped list (in no particular order) of 35 street style stars you should know as we head into Fashion Month—from established editors to faces you’ve probably seen but can’t quite place.

Searches : http://stylecaster.com/ultimate-guide-50-street-style-allstars/

Read more: http://stylecaster.com/ultimate-guide-50-street-style-allstars/#ixzz5AZeIOCDi

STREET STYLE HAS BECOME JUST AS MAJOR AS THE RUNWAY SHOWS THEMSELVES. CHECK OUT THESE STREET STYLE STARS FOR FASHION INSPIRATION. 

50-street-style-allstars



 

 

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY 2018

How will you #PressforProgress?
#IWD2018  March 8

IWD #PressforProgress Theme

 

Now, more than ever, there’s a strong call-to-action to press forward and progress gender parity. There’s a strong call to #PressforProgress motivating and uniting friends, colleagues and whole communities to think, act and be gender inclusive.

#PressforProgress

www.internationalwomensday.com

 

HAPPY WOMENS DAY FASHİON ile ilgili görsel sonucu